Posts tagged with ‘physiotherapy’

  • Knowledge Blog

    IMPROVING FITNESS THROUGH INJURY

    - by Imtiaz

    Health and fitness requires a lot of hard work and sacrifice. For those committed to improving themselves daily – like the people we see in our gyms – there’s some risk involved too. You could cut your shin on a box jump, twist your ankle while running, or sprain a shoulder muscle while practising some gymnastics.

    You could also get hit by a bus while crossing the road, or by a buck while cycling through the bush. Those are all educated risks.

    You can either sit back to become overweight and unhealthy to avoid the short-term risk of a niggle from training, or you can overlook that small short-term risk for massive long-term benefits. Just as you can stay indoors to avoid the world, or you can go on with living your life.

    There are some educated risks to leading an active and healthy lifestyle. Every now and then you’re going to pick up a niggle or an injury. So how should you approach training while you are nursing an injury? I see two approaches: the pigheaded approach and the smart approach. Let’s talk about the smart approach because that pigheadedness (that is a word) is what gets you injured.

    Tip #1: Pain Free RoM

    The most common symptom of an injury is pain. While there are varying pain sensations, pain is inevitable and is a sign of damage. You should never move through pain. This might mean reducing the range of motion (RoM) about a joint for particular movements and in more severe cases it means not moving that joint at all.

    At the end stage of the recovery and rehab process you typically have no pain through the full RoM, but as soon as you add load there is pain. RoM is significantly more important than load. Therefore, reduce or remove load to ensure full RoM with no pain.

    Tip #2: Seek Treatment & Guidance

    If you have picked up a musculoskeletal injury then you really should have already seen a physiotherapist for diagnosis and treatment. If you haven’t then you’re veering towards the pigheaded route. A physio can determine which structure is injured and treat it accordingly. This manual therapy aids the recovery process.

    The physio and your coaches will then be able to guide you on what to do in training to ensure that you continue improving fitness while the injured area recovers (as long as you listen). You can’t do this alone or with Dr. Google, neither of you have the relevant skills, education or mindset. Even physios need physios.

    Tip #3: Make Strict Bodyweight Movements a Priority

    Injuries generally prevent you from moving external loads. Fitness isn’t just defined by how much load you can move, and gymnastics comes before weightlifting in your development as an athlete. So RE-focus your time and efforts on strict bodyweight movements. That means no kipping.

    This has the huge benefit of better strength with no downsides. And even though you aren’t doing them, when you do get back to more dynamic movements you’ll be MORE proficient at them thanks to your bigger base level of strength. Yeah, you should be doing that from the very beginning, but one can only lead the horse to the water, yeah?

    Tip #4: Prioritise Your Nutrition

    Nutrition is the most important aspect of your health and fitness. You need to eat enough to support your activity levels but not body fat. When you’re nursing and injury your activity levels generally drop. If they do drop, you should be eating less. “My nutrition is better when I’m training properly” is just an excuse to stuff your face because you’re feeling sorry for yourself.

    Less exercise = less need for calories. More importantly, what you eat directly influences your body’s ability to recover from any form of trauma.

    Tip #5: Have a Game Plan

    You’ll need to follow Tip #2 in order to have an effective and realistic game plan in place. That’s because the most common behaviour with athletes and injury is returning to their pre-injury levels of intensity as soon as they’re feeling “good.”

    You might be completely pain free, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that the injured structures are fully recovered. Soft tissue takes a long time to recover, and you also need to recognise that you aren’t just recovering from the injury itself – you need to recover from the inactivity too 😉

    Part of the game plan is continuing to train. One of the most important aspects of rehabilitation is ensuring that other parts of the body and other areas of fitness continue to improve while the injured area recovers. And that is totally doable. Take a look at the Instagram video below of Kevin Ogar. Kevin was a Regional level CrossFit athlete who was injured in a freak accident. He is now bound to a wheelchair, but his fitness has continued to improve – so much so that he is now able to sit in a squat!

    Tip #6: Be Smart, Not Pigheaded

  • Knowledge Blog

    TRAINING THROUGH INJURY

    - by Imtiaz

    Health and fitness requires a lot of hard work and sacrifice. For those committed to improving themselves daily – like the people we see in our gyms – there’s some risk involved too. You could cut your shin on a box jump, twist your ankle while running, or sprain a shoulder muscle while practising some gymnastics. You could also get hit by a taxi while crossing the road. Those are all educated risks. You can either sit back to become overweight and unhealthy to avoid the short-term risk of a niggle from training, or you can overlook that short-term risk for massive long-term benefits. Just as you can stay indoors to avoid what could hurt you, or you can go on with living your life.

    There are some educated risks to leading an active and healthy lifestyle. Every now and then you’re going to pick up a niggle or an injury. So how should you approach training while you are nursing an injury? I see two approaches: the pigheaded approach and the smart approach. Let’s talk about the smart approach because that will highlight pigheadedness. Yes, that’s a word. I just made it up.

    Tip #1: Pain Free RoM

    The most common symptom of an injury is pain. While there are varying pain sensations, pain is inevitable and is a sign of damage. You should never move through pain. This might mean reducing the range of motion (RoM) about a joint for particular movements and in more severe cases it means not moving that joint at all.
    At the end stage of the recovery and rehab process you typically have no pain through the full RoM, but as soon as you add load there is pain. RoM is significantly more important than load. Therefore, reduce or remove load to ensure full RoM with no pain.

    Tip #2: Seek Treatment & Guidance

    If you have picked up a musculoskeletal injury then you really should have already seen a physiotherapist for diagnosis and treatment. If you haven’t then you’re veering towards the pigheaded route. A physio can determine which structure is injured and treat it accordingly. This manual therapy aids the recovery process.
    The physio and your coaches will then be able to guide you on what to do in training to ensure that you continue improving fitness while the injured area recovers (as long as you listen). You can’t do this alone or with Dr. Google, neither of you have the relevant skills, education or mindset.

    Tip #3: Make Strict Bodyweight Movements a Priority

    Injuries generally prevent you from moving external loads. Fitness isn’t just defined by how much load you can move, and gymnastics comes before weightlifting in your development as an athlete. So REfocus on your time and efforts on strict bodyweight movements. That means no kipping. This has the huge benefit of better strength with no downsides. And even though you aren’t doing them, when you do get back to more dynamic movements you’ll be MORE proficient at them thanks to your bigger base level of strength. Yeah, you should be doing that from the very beginning, but one can only lead the horse to the water.

    Tip #4: Prioritise Your Nutrition

    Nutrition is the most important aspect of your health and fitness. You need to eat enough to support your activity levels but not body fat. When you’re nursing and injury your activity levels generally drop. If they do drop, you should be eating less. “My nutrition is better when I’m training properly” is just an excuse to stuff your face because you’re feeling sorry for yourself. Less exercise = less need for calories.
    More importantly, what you eat directly influences your body’s ability to recover from any form of trauma.

    Tip #5: Have a Game Plan

    You’ll need to follow Tip #2 in order to have an effective and realistic game plan in place. That’s because the most common behaviour with athletes and injury is returning to their pre-injury levels of intensity as soon as they’re feeling “good.” You might be completely pain free, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that the injured structures are fully recovered. Soft tissue takes a long time to recover, and you also need to recognise that you aren’t just recovering from the injury itself – you need to recover from the inactivity too 😉

    Tip #6: Be Smart, Not Pigheaded

     

  • Knowledge Blog

    MEMBER PROFILE: JACO VAN ZYL

    - by carl

    WHAT DO YOU DO FOR A JOB?

    I’m a Software Developer at BBD.

    HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN TRAINING AT CFJ EAST?

    Around four months.

    HOW DID YOU FIRST HEAR ABOUT CrossFit?

    Can’t really say. Have heard about it a very long time ago, but only started looking into it properly just before we started.

    WHAT IS THE COOLEST THING THAT YOU HAVE ACHIEVED AT CFJ EAST?

    Pretty much all the Olympic lifts. After the Chiro said I shouldn’t/can’t ever squat again, every day is an achievement for me!

    WHAT CHANGES IN YOUR HEALTH HAVE YOU NOTICED SINCE STARTING CrossFit?

    I used to have back and neck pain 80% of the time because of my scoliosis. Since I started CrossFit that has gone away completely. I used to also have extreme back pain in the past when I tried to squat, which is gone now also. No more skipping leg day!

    FAVOURITE EXERCISE?

    I’ve got a big love/hate relationship going with pull-ups. Ring dips is also awesome. Basically most of the gymnastics stuff.

    WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGE IN CrossFit?

    Anything legs related and back/shoulder mobility. My legs are far behind, but now I can finally train them again thanks to CrossFit and some great coaching!

    LIST SOME OF YOUR GOALS.

    –        Muscle ups

    –        Skipping

    –        Handstands

    –        Doubling my current squat weight J

    WHAT IS YOUR NUTRITION FIT? (Paleo, Zone, anything and everything, etc.)

    Sugar free as far as possible, and some loose calorie counting.

     

  • WOD Blog | Workout of the day

    TUESDAY 08-07-14: Say No to NSAIDs

    - by Imtiaz

    Today’s post is an article Tamarr received from a doctor she works with. It’s a short read about the potential effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Say NO to NSAIDs

    NSAIDs refers to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which are effective against mild to moderate pain, fever and inflammation. They are widely used in joint and musculoskeletal pain, as well as other pain and inflammatory conditions.

    NSAIDs work by affecting the body’s normal inflammatory process through interference of prostaglandins (the body’s natural mediator for pain, fever and inflammation). This takes place on sites throughout the body, other than the brain and spinal cord.

    Examples of NSAIDs

    • Salicylates (e.g. Aspirin®, Disprin®)
    • Diclofenac (e.g. Arthrotec®, Cataflam®, Panamor®, Voltaren®)
    • Ibuprofen (e.g. Brufen®)
    • Flurbiprofen (e.g. Transact®)
    • Celecoxib (e.g. Celebrex®)

    Side effects of NSAIDs

    • NSAIDs can negatively affect the stomach, kidneys, heart and blood vessels through it’s anti-prostaglandin efffect.
    • NSAIDs commonly cause stomach ulcers and bleeds, and people who currently have or have previously had stomach ulcers should avoid taking NSAIDs.
    • High doses or prolonged use of NSAIDs can also lead to damage of the kidneys and even kidney failure. NSAIDs should not be used during major sporting activities since the combination of the drug and dehydration can cause impaired kidney function.
    • Recently studies have also found that NSAIDs can increase the risk of heart attack by at least 12%. The higher the dose, the higher the risk. This happens because some prostagladins are also responsible for blood vessel lubrication. Since NSAIDs cause the body to retain fluid in the kidneys they can also worsen high blood pressure and heart failure.

    So what’s the best alternative for musculoskeletal pain relief? At present, the most scientifically reliable and valid treatment is physiotherapy! Physiotherapy uses a variety of modalities in order to relieve pain. These include ice/heat therapy, electrotherapy, such as ultrasound and interferential, massage, dry needling and therapeutic exercise. These are safe alternative methods to using NSAIDs.

    Dr. Stavrou


    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO CANNAH KYD!

    LEVEL 1

    A.
    High-bar back squat
    3-3-3-3-3
    Progressive

    B.
    Hang clean (knees)
    3-3-3-3-3-3-3 (across)
    Aim to do a set every 2 minutes

    LEVEL 2 & 3

    A.
    High-bar back squat
    3-3-3-3-3+
    80ish% across. To fatigue on last set

    B.
    Hang clean (knees)
    3-3-3-3-3-3-3 (progressive)
    Aim to do a set every 2 minutes

  • WOD Blog | Workout of the day

    WEDNESDAY 21-05-14

    - by Imtiaz

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO HERCULES SMIT!

    Physio Blog: Voodoo Floss Application – The Ankle

    Have you been told by your coach that you have poor ankle mobility? Especially when you don’t squat easily below parallel? Get hold of some voodoo floss and try this application out.

    Here is a reminder of why we use voodoo floss:

    • gains in range I.e. Mobility
    • rehab of injured muscles
    • pain relief eg. with elbow tendinitis or post exercise pain
    • warmup eg. before lifting, in order to get the maximum range for the lift
    • compression for injury

     

    1. Test your squat. Get a feel of what it feels like before voodoo floss application
    2. Start below the heel on the foot and wrap the floss tightly around around the foot and heel covering the ankle. It must feel very tight, it’s only too tight if you feel tingling or numbness into your foot
    3. Do 3 sets of 5-8 squats with the floss on, or mobilise your ankle in a squat position for two minutes.
    4. Remove floss and retest your squat.

    Tamarr Schroeder Physiotherapy

    Workout

    In teams of 4-6:

    AMRAP 7 minutes
    40m Farmer carry
    40m sled push

    Rest 3 minutes

    AMRAP 7 minutes
    20m Farmer carry
    20m sled push

    Split your team in to 2 groups – half on the carry and the other half at the sled. On the call of “GO!” athlete 1 begins the carry while athlete 2 begins the sled push.
    AThletes 3 and 4 take over, relay style, when they return. Complete this as many times as you can in the allocated time.
    You can swap between the carry and sled stations as often as you like.