Posts tagged with ‘intensity’

  • WOD Blog | Workout of the day

    THURSDAY 05-04-2018

    - by Admin

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO PETER HARKER!

    ENDURANCE CLUB

    A. ROWING SKILLS

    B. WARM-UP/TECHNIQUE DRILLING

    3 x 2 mins w/ 1 min rest

    C. TIME TRIAL

    2km time trial
    Hold a stroke rate of 30 for as long as possible

    Record 3 numbers:
    1: How long you held the 30 SR for
    2: Total time
    3: Average 500m split time

    GI JOZI

    AMRAP 12:

    200m run
    15 box jumps
    10 ball slams

    Rest 5 minutes

    AMRAP 12:

    5 pull ups
    10 sit ups
    15 wall balls

  • Knowledge Blog

    WHAT’S THE STANDARD?

    - by Imtiaz

    With the Open coming up and thanks to the billion local competitions happening, a question often asked in class is “what’s the standard for this movement?” In events, like the Open, movement standards are used to define the prescribed task and to standardise the tasks to ensure that all participants are subject to the same requirements. All sports have standards; out of bounds lines, scoring positions, infringements, etc. And it’s all for the same purpose–to create a level playing field.

    What we do in class, however, is not a sport. It’s training. One of the reasons you participate in a sport, like the Open, is to test the fitness you’ve developed in training. Therefore, there are no standards in training.

    Before you take that and run (a bigger) riot in class, that does not mean you’re free to do whatever floats your boat in training. We teach you particular positions in training because they are the safest positions that will also yield the best results quickly. We spend most of our time in those fundamental positions, such as feet shoulder width in the squat, and when we’ve developed consistently good mechanics with intensity we freestyle it by playing with positions to suit the workout while increasing our skill level. We also drill good range of motion (RoM) in training because it pertains to improving your fitness.

    So if we had to use phrases to define the difference, there are competition standards versus movement in training. What you should recognise is that consistently good movement in training naturally gives you high competition standards.

    To go back to what we do in training, testing forms a part of evaluating training progress. When we do fitness testing in sessions, we do use some standards to ensure that you have a consistent and measurable baseline to track changes against.

    In training, focus on consistently good positions. If you enter a competition, adhere to the movement standards to avoid no-reps. In training, there are no no-reps (unless we’re testing fitness ;-)).

    –Imtiaz

  • Knowledge Blog

    MODIFY FOR A BIGGER ENGINE

    - by Imtiaz

    The images below are of a text message chat I had last year with one of our dear members, Dmtry The Russian. It was following a workout that involved three barbell movements and the prescribed guideline load was your body weight. I trained in the class after Dmtry and when I got there he was still in the trenches, trying to complete the workout right at the time cap. I told him I’d kick his ass in the workout. I apologise for the poor quality of the image and my colourful language!

    Dmtry did the maths. Although it’s not the most accurate calculation of power output, it shows that I had a far greater power output than him. I did kick his ass. He chose the guideline load of his body weight and that resulted in a time of 28 minutes. I went with 10kg under my bodyweight and finished in 17:50. Did he work hard? Absolutely. Was his workout effective? Not in the least. He didn’t get stronger (because it wasn’t designed to be a strength workout), nor did he increase his capacity (which was the primary goal of that workout).

    He felt like he worked hard. But intensity isn’t a feeling. It’s based on how much work you do relative to the time you do it in. And the only way you’ll ever achieve the intended benefits of a workout is by modifying it to your abilities.

    What you see on the whiteboard is a guideline, and along with the coach’s directions on the intended benefits of the workout, that gives you a template for that day’s session. You will almost always need to modify the session in some way. How do you do that? We use a simple guide:

    • First reduce the technical demand of the movement/s. This is especially so for barbell and gymnastics movements.
    • Reduce the load–put less kilograms on the bar. We can also reduce load on gymnastics movements.
    • Reduce volume (reps/distance/sets/calories/etc.). This is probably done the least yet is so effective.

    That order changes depending on the workout, but you should be doing some form of modification most of the time, regardless of your experience. Remember, the programming isn’t based on what you all used to be able to do. It’s based on where you could be.

    –Imtiaz

  • Knowledge Blog

    TECHNIQUE, YES. BUT, INTENSITY.

    - by Imtiaz

    A threshold is a limit, a point that must be exceeded in order for favourable adaptations to occur. One of the thresholds to consider in fitness is the technique/intensity threshold. When you go beyond that threshold in training, technique diminishes at the expense of power output (intensity). Technique is essential to maximising power and therefore fitness, but good technique without optimal speed will in fact stunt fitness.

    It’s like motor sports.The best drivers are the ones who find that balance between speed and accuracy. But they only find that balance by tempting speed and by learning to take the vehicle all the way to almost losing control before reigning it in.

    That’s what you need to do in training. Just like we stress your cardiorespiratory system for endurance adaptations and your muscular system for strength gains, your “control” must be stressed for it to improve. Fortunately, in training, the consequences aren’t as severe as in motor sports!

    Most of this practice refers to metabolic conditioning and not strength work, because in strength work time is generally not an essential factor. So to train your conditioning workouts, develop your control just as the race care driver.

    Start off by ensuring you’ve scaled the loads, movements and volume appropriately. The programmed workouts you see on the board are a guideline. When the workout starts, work quickly to a pace you feel you’re able to maintain for the duration of that workout. Once you’ve settled in, up your speed – lower the time cycle of your reps.

    Here is where your gray matter – your conscious brain – comes in. You have to be able to feel the difference between good and bad technique. If you haven’t felt your technique going with increased speed, you’ll soon find out. You’ll miss lifts and reps, lose control of your swing on the pull-up bar or rings, land up in the box instead of on top of it. It’s the tail of the race car going too wide for the driver to bring it back, leaving the car in a spin.

    You’ve got to slow down before that happens. Regain traction to bring that tail back in, and then ease back on the gas again. This time, holding your speed just under the previous attempt.

    As you develop this control your power output begins to increase, and that’s where the results lie.

    Will it result in some less than optimal technique? Absolutely, but that’s how you find your control. Will that place you at risk of injury? Unless you keep moving at a speed that is uncontrollable, it shouldn’t. That control is a tricky thing to develop. It’s partly what we as coaches are there for. But it’s important for you to develop it on your own too.

    Finding that threshold is also finding the point of most discomfort. Find it, and hang out there for as long as you can!

  • WOD Blog | Workout of the day

    SATURDAY 11-11-2017

    - by Admin

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO JASON BROWNE, ‘LIL NICK THEMISTOCLEOUS AND WERNER KROLL!

    BARBELL CLUB

    A. SNATCH

    1 rep OTM x 5 / load
    80%
    85%
    90%

    B. CLEAN & JERK

    1 rep OTM x 5 / load
    80%
    85%
    90%

    G.I. JOZI

    TABATA – Ring Rows
    Rest 1 minute
    TABATA – Skipping
    Rest 1 minute
    TABATA – Sit ups
    Rest 1 minute
    TABATA – Shuttle sprints
    Rest 1 minute
    TABATA – Plank hold
    Rest 1 minute

    TABATA = 8 intervals of 20 seconds of Work followed by 10 seconds of Rest